Ring-KDE 3.0.0 has been released

Hello Planet,

It has been some time. I come back from the shadows to announce the release of Ring-KDE 3.0.0, A GNU Ring.cx client. GNU Ring is a secure and distributed communication platform based on open standards. It weaves industry standard technologies to work together and provides audio calls, video conferences, chat, screen sharing and peer to peer file transfer between you and your friends. Additionally, its use of open standards allows to bridge to various other systems like the main phone network or SIP compatible devices.

When joining the GNU Ring, no servers or centralized accounts are needed. Beside an optional blockchain-based way to reserve your username against takeover, nothing leaves your device. All your data is kept under your control. Ring-KDE provides a simple wizard to help you create credentials or import your personal information from other devices.

This release is a full rewrite of the application to use more modern technologies such as touch support, QtQuick2 and KDE Kirigami adaptive widget framework. The old Ring-KDE was a fork of an older KDE application called SFLPhone. At the time, it was focused on being a office phone replacement for your KDE desktop instead of being a more generic multimedia communication software.

The screenshots below show the old SFLPhone/Ring-KDE 2.x versus Ring-KDE 3.0.0:

 

This blog entry wont try to list every single change from the 2.x series because
that’s too much amazement for a single post. A more useful introduction is how to use it.

Ring 2.x and the older SFLPhone versions used mostly the history and address book to select who to call. This made sense for a phone, but the newly expanded scope changes this. While they are both still available, from now on, the user interface is based on the timeline concept:

timeline.gif

Version 3.x also has better support for video, screen sharing and file streaming.

video

Most relevant audio call features have been ported to the new application including multi-call support, hold, recording and notifications:

call4

The basic chat support has been replaced with an integrated timeline that contains all the calls, chat messages, video capture, recordings and eventually file transfer and images.

chat

Navigation has been revamped and is now using a search box as the primary way of finding your friends. It uses locally stored data to avoid uploading too much potentially private information to the cloud. Only looking for registered user names normally uses the internet. It is optionally possible to download this information locally, but it uses more disk, CPU and network resources to keep up-to-date.

search.gif

In the immediate future, the next few versions will try to fix bug, improve performance and catch up with recent improvements to Kirigami2, KDE own touch-friendly set of widgets and application design guidelines. Since beginning to work on Ring-KDE 3, Kirigami has made great progress, but Ring-KDE 3.0 still mostly reflects the state of the art from a year ago.

 

Download:

Ring-KDE can be built from source if the ring-daemon is also built from source. The source code for Ring-KDE 3.0.0 can be downloaded here.

For everyone else, Ring-KDE is available as an easy to use AppImage:

https://download.kde.org/stable/ring-kde/3.0.0/ring-kde_3.0.0_x86_64.AppImage

To use the AppImage, download it, right click, choose Properties -> Permissions and check “is executable”, Then open the file. When using the AppImage, no other dependencies are required. If you also have another GNU Ring.cx like the Gnome client, please close it and run “killall dring” before executing the AppImage to avoid conflicts between the two versions.

akademy.jpg

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15 thoughts on “Ring-KDE 3.0.0 has been released

  1. Pingback: Ring-KDE 3.0: el cliente de GNU Ring para Plasma se renueva » MuyLinux

  2. Pingback: Ring-KDE 3.0: el cliente de GNU Ring para Plasma se renueva – Corrientes Primero

  3. Pingback: Liberado Ring-KDE 3.0 – Linux en movimiento

  4. Pingback: Ring-KDE 3.0.0 Released, Intel Debuts 32TB Ruler-Shaped SSDs, OpenEMR Security Issues, PostgreSQL Updates and New Version of Unigine | Linux Press

  5. Pingback: Выпуск децентрализованного коммуникационного клиента Ring-KDE 3.0.0 — AllUNIX.ru — Всероссийский портал о UNIX-системах

  6. There seem to be issues with the appimage. On kubuntu 18.04 with the kde backports, there is no help and on quit the client segfaults.

  7. Pingback: Ring-KDE 3.0.0 Released, Intel Debuts 32TB Ruler-Shaped SSDs, OpenEMR Security Issues, PostgreSQL Updates and New Version of Unigine | Geek Tech News

  8. It looks great. I gave it a try (not that I had anyone to ring) and it come up ok. But it was using 100% CPU on my pathetic little laptop. Once it is sorted, it will be a real contender.

  9. > But it was using 100% CPU on my pathetic little laptop. Once it is sorted, it will be a real contender.

    Hello. Performance is a known issue with this release. Many corners were cuts to get to feature parity with the other clients and some technologies used for this rewrite are definitely not ready for prime time. Performance should go back to ~1-2% CPU after version 3.1 once under development pieces fall into place. Many less polished widgets and performance bottlenecks are currently temporary modules awaiting to be removed and replaced with unfinished (and upstreamed) components.

    > There seem to be issues with the appimage. On kubuntu 18.04 with the kde backports, there is no help and on quit the client segfaults.

    Hi, it would be interesting to get the crash report when quitting on https://bugs.kde.org. As for the documentation (and translation), they are not part of the AppImage due to some technical (and size) limitations. They exist and would be part of the potential distribution packages, but not the AppImage.

  10. Pingback: Ring-KDE 3.0.0 Released, Intel Debuts 32TB Ruler-Shaped SSDs, OpenEMR Security Issues, PostgreSQL Updates and New Version of Unigine - Dunia IT

  11. It seems like the number of good SIP phones for linux has decreased over the last few years as a number of good open source projects seem to have disappeared. I was sad to see SFL phone disappear and didn’t know how ring would replace it. In testing this appimage I was actually quite surprised at the functionality of this first release. While I’ve only tested SIP calling, there are still things that are rough around the edges, and cpu usage seems a bit high at the moment, but the SIP functionality seems to work pretty well. Congrats to the ring team. This kde version is shaping up to take it’s place as one of the better SIP phones out there. Looking forward to the next release to see if it can become my daily driver.

  12. > While I’ve only tested SIP calling, there are still things that are rough around the edges, and cpu usage seems a bit high at the moment, but the SIP functionality seems to work pretty well. Congrats to the ring team.

    Thanks.

    In theory, I think the only missing features are related to transfer. The multi-party audio conferences also probably regressed a bit, but are otherwise there. 3.1 or 3.2 will rewrite the config dialog (to QML) and fix some regressions there too. It’s currently not *too* bad, it usually works, but for sure SIP accounts are harder to add than RING ones.

    As said above, the CPU usage was a well known issue at the time of the release, but could not be fixed in the short term. Feedbacks are important and bugs report welcome (on bugs.kde.org). Waiting for longer for feedbacks made little sense at this point given the feature set was complete. The tech that will fix the CPU usage issue is coming, but is a very complex beast and the inefficient (but very simple) one used here was favored for 3.0.0 (due to its stability).

    • Thanks for the quick reply. I’ll keep watching bugs.kde.org, and do what I can to test and report any bugs that I find

  13. Pingback: Выпуск децентрализованного коммуникационного клиента Ring-KDE 3.0.0

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